My thoughts

UK Attitude Adjustment: A Simple message to employers.

For many years the UK has been one of the leading countries for equal rights. Although there were laws before 2010, one of the biggest game changes was the Equality act 2010 http://www.acas.org.uk/equalityact .
As a nation we are lucky to have such acts. You only have to look at America, where  a same sex couple can marry on the Saturday but by Monday be sacked for their sexuality. The Trump administration doesn’t seem to be doing anything to promote equality for anyone different to themselves. 

Even if there was a miracle and laws in less diversed accepting countries changed tomorrow then it wouldn’t  solve one of the biggest issues regarding to equality, globally… Attitude

Attitude is still an issue here too!

 

It is still possible that in the UK lgbtqia people have applied for jobs and secretly not got the position, not because of their qualifications but because of their sexuality or gender.

There is no way you can prove this ethier way. 

You only have to look at cases such as the Soho landlord that discriminated against a gay couple who kissed in his pub. 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1377152/John-Snow-pub-kiss-protest-gay-couple-thrown-snogging.html 

Ask yourself would employers who show discrimination in general towards the LGBTQIA community employ a lgbt person? 

By law they should not discriminate in regards of employing,  so technically the owners of Ashers bakery in Northern Ireland (the gay cake row) could be in even more hot dough if they don’t employ a lgbtqia person if they applied for a position and are qualified. 

Sorry I mean hot water, not dough! 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2016/oct/24/born-again-christian-ashers-bakery-lose-court-appeal-in-gay-cake-row

This case continues because a same sex couple has now been refused since the original case. It is thought that the bakery are being backed by homophobic Christian organisations. 

Of cause there is the argument that it is an infringement on their beliefs, but what about others beliefs too? The law was designed to protect everyone’s rights. What if people discriminate on the grounds of the owners being Christian. Wouldn’t they take action too? 



You only have to look at online remarks to understand that there is still anti lgbt sentiment out there.  You have to think how much damage this negative attitude secretly has on people who fall in minority groups and not only secretly at times, look at the hate crimes since brexit towards the LGBTQIA community and you can understand.

I’m not one for public displays of affection, however  if anything it’s acceptable for heterosexual couples, should it be acceptable for couples who are in a same sex relationship? 

It’s easy to understand why some people are not open with the gender or sexuality at times when prejudices still exist. 

It is easy to understand why groups that by definition have no choice but to be open, such as the transgender community can feel isolated. 

If you feel you don’t agree in kissing in public at all, next time you go out for a night out count how many times you see straight couples kiss
 

We seem to turn ourselves off to the common kiss because that’s exactly what it is, showing affection to the one you love.
In a similar situation to the Soho incident, there was another in a supermarket where a manager decided to ask a couple to leave because they kissed in an aisle. The supermarket then experienced protests, which must have not look good on a national chain.  This incident is down to the ignorance of a staff member and I am sure that the supermarket wouldn’t be so effected financially as the pub in Soho, which goes to show if you only have five employees and a small turnover its even more important to protect your business from a decision of a staff member. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-29628854 
If an employer is found guilty of discrimination in any way, it could cost them dearly.

Going back to the Soho incident when the landlord heard that there would be a protest outside his establishment, he decided to close for the night, claiming victory although his bigotry cost him  lost of sales, and a bad reputation in an area where the LGBT community are a high proportion of the population.
Certain quarters would see what the LGBT community do by protesting is self-centered and are not looking at the bigger picture of what is beneficial for all society. That’s only if you look at it from a gay rightsprospective. If you view it as an infringement on equality then you need to ask yourself…. 

Would you get away with it if another couple from a different minority group walked into the pub and were asked to leave? 

Or

How would he have felt if the brewer told him he was too old to run a public house anymore? 

Discrimination is discrimination. 

Equal rights effects us all, be it if you are the gay man who was asked to leave the pub, or the young married lady who suspects she didn’t get a job because she may want time off shortly for maternity.
An infringement on ‘lgbtqia’ rights can also affect someone who you wouldn’t expect it to.

Unfortunately none of us can see in the others head and know what’s going on in another persons life at that moment in time.  On surface you could have a completely straight male workforce and yet it still can affect others if one of the staff is being homophobic/transphobic/biphobic. 
Maybe a member of staff is struggling with their own sexuality or even a family member such as a grandson or daughter so badly that anti lgbt sentiment from someone else could actually be upsetting and effect performance in one way or another.  There are also many examples in the public eye that demonstrate the diversity  of the LGBT+ family, and many more that we may not be aware of.  There are many people out there who struggle with not even having sexuality and not interested in ether sex.

As an employer you need to ask yourself how you can help yourself to understand the affects of someone’s sexuality and what you can do to in order to help your employees in the most subtle ways as you can.  Can you mention positive things about LGBT when someone mentions a negative? Can you warn someone for using words that are deemed hateful or even the phrase ‘that’s so gay’ can actually be upsetting to someone young,  Gay, and vulnerable. Is there anyway you can make your staff more aware of issues and subtly change their attitudes?

It could be as simple as being clued up on misconceptions such as Transgender and bisexual issues as well as homosexual issues too. 

It may be as simple as having a simple equality and diversity training session and featuring all parts of the workforce.

Help people understand because changing attitudes could actually change the lives of your employees, sparking a happier workforce. 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-13096519

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